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7 edition of Rhetoric and reality in Plato"s Phaedrus found in the catalog.

Rhetoric and reality in Plato"s Phaedrus

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Published by State University of New York Press in Albany .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Plato.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 319-330) and index.

    StatementDavid A. White.
    SeriesSUNY series in ancient Greek philosophy
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsB380 .W48 1993
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxv, 340 p. ;
    Number of Pages340
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL1562511M
    ISBN 100791412334, 0791412342
    LC Control Number91043967


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Rhetoric and reality in Plato"s Phaedrus by White, David A. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Rhetoric and reality in Plato's Phaedrus. [David A White] -- The Phaedrus is well-known for the splendid mythical panorama Socrates develops in his second speech, and for its graphic descriptions of erotic behavior.

This book shows how the details of the myth. The Phaedrus is well-known for the splendid mythical panorama Socrates develops in his second speech, and for its graphic descriptions of erotic behavior.

This book shows how the details of the myth and the accounts of interaction between lovers are based on a carefully articulated metaphysical by: The Phaedrus is well-known for the Rhetoric and reality in Platos Phaedrus book mythical panorama Socrates Rhetoric and reality in Platos Phaedrus book in his second speech, and for its graphic descriptions of erotic behavior.

This book shows how the details of the myth and the accounts of interaction between lovers are based on a carefully articulated metaphysical structure. Rhetoric and reality in Plato's Phaedrus. Albany: State University of New York Press, © (DLC) (OCoLC) Named Person: Plato.

Material Type: Document, Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Authors / Contributors: David A White.

Plato's discussions of rhetoric and poetry are both extensive and influential. As in so many other cases, he sets the agenda for the subsequent tradition.

And yet understanding his remarks about each of these topics—rhetoric and poetry—presents us with significant philosophical and interpretive challenges. Phaedrus remains discontented with the understanding of rhetoric that Socrates proposes.

After all, Socrates has yet to address many things—“everything, at any rate, written up in the books on the art of speaking” (d). Socrates's treatment of rhetoric in the Phaedrus emphasizes ethical problems of the orator's manipulation of the listeners, but these ethical concerns are founded on a metaphysical problem: the techniques of rhetoric, as they are applied by sophists and orators like Lysias, fall short of representing reality and thus fail to convey the truth.

The Phaedrus (/ ˈ f iː d r ə s /; Greek: Φαῖδρος, translit. Phaidros), written by Plato, is a dialogue between Plato's protagonist, Socrates, and Phaedrus, an interlocutor in several Phaedrus was presumably composed around BCE, about the same time as Plato's Republic and Symposium.

Although ostensibly about the topic of love, the discussion in the dialogue revolves. This book has been cited by the following publications. Marina McCoy explores Plato's treatment of the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists through a thematic treatment of six different Platonic dialogues, including Apology, Protagoras, Gorgias, Republic, Sophist, and Phaedras.

Rhetoric and Reality in Plato's Phaedrus. Albany, NY: SUNY Author: Marina McCoy. SuperSummary, a modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, offers high-quality study guides for challenging works of literature. This page guide for “Phaedrus” by Plato includes detailed chapter summaries and analysis, as well as several more in-depth sections of expert-written literary analysis.

Featured content includes commentary on major characters, 25 important quotes, essay. Phaedrus, an Athenian aristocrat, and Socrates (/69– BCE) sit outside the city walls, close to a stream, in the shade of a plane tree away from the heat of the midday sun.

As the cicadas pulse in the grass, they discuss the art of rhetoric, metempsychosis (the Greek tradition of reincarnation) and the nature of erotic love, a state akin Author: Paula Marvelly.

Phaedrus excused himself, although, Socrates insisted that Phaedrus to retell the speech. Plato wrote the Phaedrus that was a dialogue and discussion of philosophical issues between Socrates and Phaedrus. In the book of Phaedrus, it is revealed that Socrates did not like writing claiming that writing did not represent a complete knowledge.

The Republic vs. Phaedrus: Plato’s Treatment of Poetry and Rhetoric Many platonic dialogues incorporate critiques of the arts, among them poetry in The Republic and rhetoric in Phaedrus.

While poetry and rhetoric emerge in these dialogues from seemingly very separate discussions, one concerning the nature of the best regime and another of. It is a "sustained discussion of Rhetoric" in which Plato used Eros as examples.

(xxxviii) Scully's interpretation is slightly different; this is where I find my own position to be closer to. His argument is that Love and Rhetoric are equal parts of Plato's Phaedrus/5.

The book’s greatest value lies in the penetrating close analysis of the text itself: there are some real highlights and Werner’s readings will be of much help not only to students of the Phaedrus, but to all scholars interested in Plato’s literary and philosophical practice.' Source: Philosophy in Review.

- Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists - by Marina McCoy Excerpt. Introduction. This book explores how Plato separates the philosopher from the sophist through the dramatic opposition of Socrates to rhetoricians and sophists.

In one way, its thesis is simple. The Phaedrus is the ultimate attack on rhetoric from Plato, and its practices. It follows Socrates and Phaedrus as they discuss love, and other ideas. But it sets up somewhat of a villain within the work as well.

There is a man named Lysias, trying to win Phaedrus’ heart, just as Socrates is. But they both employ different methods of doing so. Plato’s conception of rhetoric however changes in the Phaedrus.

Within the text, Plato differentiates true rhetoric from false rhetoric. He argues that it is not necessarily the practice of rhetoric which is bad but it is the practice of rhetoric shamefully or badly which leads to the art’s denunciation (Phaedrus 23).

Rhetoric is removed from its human source of inspiration. Unlike a tragedy by Sophocles, rhetoric lacks characters, dialogue, interaction, history.

What are the limits of rhetoric. Enacting the Other, Being Oneself: The Drama of Rhetoric and Philosophy in Plato’s Phaedrus Article in Classical Philology (2) April with 12 Reads How we measure 'reads'Author: Zina Giannopoulou.

Socrates. My dear Phaedrus, whence come you, and whither are you going. Phaedrus. I come from Lysias the son of Cephalus, and I am going to take a walk outside the wall, for I have been sitting with him the whole morning; and our common friend Acumenus tells me that it is much more refreshing to walk in the open air than to be shut up in a cloister.

Weaver opens his book by arguing for the structural and thematic unity of Platos Phaedrus, and his Platonism persists undiluted throughout the book.

Weavers interpretation of the Phaedrus is that the lovers represented by each of the dialogues three opening speeches are allegories for different types of /5. The Phaedrus is closely connected with the Symposium, and may be regarded either as introducing or following it.

The two Dialogues together contain the whole philosophy of Plato on the nature of love, which in the Republic and in the later writings of Plato is only introduced playfully or as a figure of speech.

But. The widespread understanding of language in the West is that it represents the world. This view, however, has not always been commonplace.

In fact, it is a theory of language conceived by Plato, culminating in The Sophist. In that dialogue Plato introduced the idea of statements as being either true or false, where the distinction between falsity and truth rests on a deeper discrepancy between Author: Robin Reames.

The second speech begins by denying that there was any truth in the preceding speeches. The only reason a boy should prefer the non-lover over the lover is if madness were “bad, pure and simple”; “but in fact the best of things have come from madness, when it is given as a gift of the god” (a).

Phaedrus: Clearly in those cases where we go off in different directions. Socrates: So the one who means to pursue a science of rhetoric must first have divided these up methodically and grasped some mark which distinguishes each of the two kinds, those in which most people are bound to tread uncertainly, and those in which they are not.

An analysis of his doctrine on love in the Symposium and Phaedrus Introduction Love is a human fact, something that happens to humans; no one would deny : Ricardo Henriquez. Symposium hangs between reality and myth, with the participants of the dialogues to contribute their own views about love.

Through the dialogues, the reader is not overwhelmed by strict philosophical context, but he is given insight to the daily life of the ancient Athenians 4/5.

Phaedrus challenges Socrates to compose a better speech and promises to erect golden statues at Delphi if the challenge can be met (d). Socrates coyly declines but, Phaedrus playfully threatens him first with force and then with something more persuasive viz., the threat of no longer engaging in discourse (c-e).

Richard Weaver’s The Ethics of Rhetoric is one such book. It is not a book for everyone. It is not a book for everyone. In so saying, this reviewer does not mean to impute that practically anyone could not read this book, but rather that the will and desire to grasp its contents are probably absent in.

In Phaedrus, Plato records the conversation of love and rhetoric between Socrates and Phaedrus. Socrates uses love as a metaphor for rhetoric by categorizing the differences between love and lust, as well as the differences between a philosopher who pursues divine truth, and a.

The Republic (Greek: Πολιτεία, translit. Politeia; Latin: Res Publica) is a Socratic dialogue, authored by Plato around BC, concerning justice (δικαιοσύνη), the order and character of the just city-state, and the just man.

It is Plato's best-known work, and has proven to be one of the world's most influential works of philosophy and political theory, both intellectually Author: Plato. Plato, in order to create a (no pun intended) rhetorical structure that fits Socrates' normal discourse structures the discussion as one around the aim or nature of rhetoric.

And Gorgias replies in typical fashion, failing to parry Socrates' thrusts and ultimately helping to. According to Smith, Plato writes in which book that the ability to adapt arguments to various types of audience members is central to a true art or techne of rhetoric.

Phaedrus If I say rhetoric is used to establish order, to allow for the wisdom-loving part of humans to overcome our base desires, and also for wisdom-lovers to persuade others.

Daniel S. Werner. Myth and Philosophy in Plato's Phaedrus. Published: J Daniel S. Werner, Myth and Philosophy in Plato's Phaedrus, Cambridge University Press,pp., $ (hbk), ISBN Reviewed by Annie Larivée, Carleton University.

Plato, The Phaedrus – a dialogue between Socrates and Phaedrus written down by the pupil of Socrates, Plato, in approximately BC.

[Headnote: In reading this excerpt from The Phaedrus which reports a dialogue between Socrates and Phaedrus, crucial to your understanding of what bothers Socrates about writing is knowing a bit about his history and his own philosophical method.

David A. White, Rhetoric and Reality in Plato's Phaedrus. [REVIEW] John A. Scott - - Philosophy in Review 14 (6) details Plato: Phaedrus in Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy.

The object of knowledge is what exists and its function to know about reality. (Plato) One trait in the philosopher's character we can assume is his love of the knowledge that reveals eternal reality, the realm unaffected by change and decay.

The Apology / Last Days of Socrates, Phaedo, Phaedrus, Theaetetus) in the future. Geoff Haselhurst. PERSONS OF THE DIALOGUE: Socrates, Phaedrus. / SCENE: Under a plane-tree, by the banks of the Ilissus.

/ SOCRATES: / My dear Phaedrus, whence come you, and whither are you going. The book’s greatest value lies in the penetrating close analysis of the text itself: there are some real highlights and Werner’s readings will be of much help not only to students of the Phaedrus, but to all scholars interested in Plato’s literary and philosophical practice."Price: $.

INTRODUCTION. The Phaedrus is closely connected with the Symposium, and may be regarded either as introducing or following it.

The two Dialogues together contain the whole philosophy of Plato on the nature of love, which in the Republic and in the later writings of Plato is only introduced playfully or as a figure of speech.Plato ( – ) Plato (Greek: Πλάτων, Plátōn) (c to c BC) was an immensely influential ancient Greek philosopher, a student of Socrates, writer of philosophical dialogues, and founder of the Academy in Athens where Aristotle studied.

Plato lectured extensively at the Academy, and wrote on many philosophical issues. The most important writings of Plato are his dialogues. The Phaedrus, written by Plato, is a dialogue between Plato’s main protagonist, Socrates, and Phaedrus, an interlocutor in several dialogues.

The Phaedrus was presumably composed around BC, around the same time as Plato’s Republic and Symposium ; with those two texts, it is often considered one of Plato’s literary high points.